More than 9,000 run the fifth Williams Route 66 Marathon and other events

More than 9,000 runners and walkers convened in downtown Tulsa for the fifth annual Williams Route 66 Marathon and related events on Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010. Starting and finishing at Veteran’s Park, race day events included the marathon, half marathon, marathon relay, 5K and one-mile fun run.

Registration grew 30 percent in 2010, and more than 600 runners ran their first marathon on the mother road. Those finishing their first marathon received the special My First Marathon medal in the Williams Route 66 family of medals. The newly-designed medals draw on the history of Route 66 while incorporating the modern aspect of the race. Classic cars and chrome wheels inspired the design, and the marathon and half marathon medals include a spinning feature, mimicking a wheel in motion.

“The growth of the Williams Route 66 Marathon to more than 9,000 in just five years is incredible,” said Chris Lieberman, executive director of the Williams Route 66 Marathon. “The family of races offers something for everyone, and today we welcomed registrants from all 50 states and several countries.”

New for 2010 included a new course, that wound through the historic Tulsa neighborhood of Swan Lake, and the grounds of Cascia Hall Preparatory School. Additionally, the Williams Route 66 Marathon offered a new Maniac Corner and a 0.3-mile detour to Tulsa’s Center of the Universe.
More than 400 runners took the detour, and received a 2.25 inch commemorative coin to mark the occasion.

In addition to thousands of spectators lining the course, more than 1,200 community members volunteered time to register participants, man water stops, work at the Health and Fitness Expo presented by St. John Health System, and pass out medals.

The course included 43 entertainment acts, including local bands and student organizations. Eric and the Adams headlined the Finish Line Festival. Tulsa’s own “voice of running,” Jack Wing, helped kick off the race and welcome the first runners to the finish line. Whit Raymond, an internationally-known race announcer, officially called the race.